This group tracks the responses of shipping industry towards environmental health concerns, highlights influence of shipping companies from EU, US and Japan etc on IMO and its Marine Environment Protection Committee & South Asian governments. It is keen to restore beaches in India, Bangladesh and Pakistan to their pristine glory for the coming generations. For more information visit: www.toxicswatch.org, banasbestosindia.blogspot.com

22/09/2012

Polluting tanker seized near Alang


BHAVNAGAR: Gujarat Pollution Control Board (GPCB) officials in Alang caught a tanker near the cable-stayed bridge on Bhavnagar-Ahmedabad highway, which was about to dispose off 17,800 litres of ammonium carbonate into the sea.
Acting on a tip-off, officials led by regional officer Anil Shah seized the tanker belonging to Vapi-based Pthalo Colours and Chemicals (India) Ltd. The company had no permission to sell this chemical.
"We will not tolerate such illegal activity in Bhavnagar," Shah said.
In last monsoon too a tanker of the same company has been caught trying to drain chemicals into the sea in Alang.
GPCB has lodged a complaint in this regard at Velavadar police station. The recipient of tanker was Super White Chemical based in Bhavnagar.
"Neither the sender nor the buyer has permission to handle this chemical. In fact, we have issued closure notices to 17 units making magnesium carbonate in which this chemical is being used as raw material," Shah said. The chemical poses a great threat to marine as well human health as well.
http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2012-09-07/rajkot/33676594_1_tanker-alang-closure-notices

09/06/2012

Mexican flagged tanker DE MARZ (ex 18 DE MARZO) Missing ?

A end of life vessel DE MARZ, or 18 DE MARZO (IMO No.7383346)was due to arrive at Colombo, Sri Lanka around 6 June 2012. ToxicsWatch Alliance (TWA) seeks help to identify the vessel's current location.

The information about this vessel whether it is headed to India or it has arrived be helpful. TWA can write to Mexican authorities to recall the vessel.

06/06/2012

Send dead toxic US ship, Exxon Valdez (now named MV Oriental N) away from Indian waters

To

Hon'ble
Union Environment & Forests Minister
Government of India
New Delhi

Subject-Send dead toxic US ship, Exxon Valdez (now named MV Oriental N) away from Indian waters

Madam,

Pursuant to my letter dated 18/5/2012 to the Hon'ble Prime Minister and a letter dated April 2, 2012 to Union Shipping Minister, I wish to draw your urgent attention in the matter of environmental security concerns from the entry of dead US vessel, MV Oriental N (formerly Exxon Valdez, Oriental Nicety, Exxon Mediterranean, Sea River Mediterranean, S/R Mediterranean, Mediterranean, and Dong Fang Ocean), relevant Supreme Court orders and the need to send this vessel out of Indian waters.

I submit that if the Supreme Court's orders of 3rd May, 11th May and 14th May are read along with the attached two applications, it becomes clearer that the order has banned entry of the dead US ship Exxon Valdez (currently named MV Oriental Nicety) due to its failure to comply with UN's Basel Convention on Transboundary Movement of Hazardous to which India is a party. It has been renamed again as MV Oriental N. All the 3 orders in the Writ Petition (Civil) 657 of 1995 are available on imowatch.blogspot.com (Supreme Court orders of 3rd-11th, & 14th May on Exxon Valdez (MV Oriental Nicety, MV Oriental N) Case )

I submit that it is indeed quite shocking that despite non-compliance of the Basel Convention (& Supreme Court order of 14th October 2003 and 3rd May 2012) the dead US ship is still in Indian waters, off Mumbai. It is attempting to set a bad precedent for hundreds of such ships to be dumped in Indian waters in connivance by US Maritime Administration and some gullible Indian officials. I submit that even in the case of another dead and hazardous US ship, the real owners had taken Indian law enforcement agencies for a ride due to lack of coordination and cooperation between Union Shipping Ministry and Union Environment & Forests Ministry.

I submit that it is a second such ship originally from USA that is outwitting Indian laws. The USA’s regulations and European Union regulations prohibit the entry of such vessels. In an Office Memorandum No.29-3/2009-HSMD, Government of India, Ministry of Environment & Forests, (HSM Division) dated 9th May, 2011, relating to implementation of Supreme Court directions in respect of ship breaking activities, the previous dead and convicted US ship, Platinum II (Ex SS Oceanic, MV Oceanic) was denied beaching permission but it remained in Indian waters without beaching. It had left US waters despite indictment by US Environment Protection Agency with the apparent connivance of MARAD. It had entered Indian waters on fake documents.

I am attaching my application seeking enforcement of Basel Convention, recommendations of Inter-Ministerial Committee on shipbreaking and the Supreme Court orders and the application filed by Best Oasis company, subsidiary of Priya Blue company seeking permission to dismantle the dead and hazardous US ship in Indian waters.

I submit that Basel Convention Technical Guidelines for the Environmentally Sound Management of the Full and Partial Dismantling of Ships was adopted at the sixth meeting of the Conference of the Parties has to be followed. This 112 page guidelines provide information and recommendations on procedures, processes and practices that should be implemented to achieve Environmentally Sound Management at ship dismantling facilities. It identifies different environmental hazards and recommends specific measures to prevent it or reduce them. It also contains a list of wastes that may be inherent in the vessel structure or on board a ship. Finally, the guidelines provide advice on monitoring and verification of environmental performance. For details regarding Basel Convention visit: http://www.basel.int


I submit that is clear from the order that compliance with UN’s on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and Their Disposal which is part of Supreme Court's order dated October 14, 2003 is required. In the order dated May 3, 2012, Supreme Court had asked Union of India, Ministry of Shipping and Ministry of Environment & Forests “to inform this Court as to the steps being taken to prevent the ship berthing in any of the ports in India, without following the conditions indicated in the Basel Convention.”

I submit that strict compliance is required of the CPCB’s 'Environmental Guidelines for Shipbreaking industries' as well It reads: "Old vessels containing or contaminated with substances such as PCBs, waste asbestos dust and fibre, lead and lead compounds are accordingly classified as hazardous materials. The customs authority and /or the concerned State Maritime Board should ensure this and issue a certificate to this effect that the vessel is free from prohibited materials."

I submit that a 2004 report of the Directorate of Naval Intelligence, Union Ministry of Defence records:"some ships arriving at the breaking yards...may be involved in nefarious activities". It noted that a large number of cash buyers are Pakistani nationals based in London and the UAE. "Due to large profit margins, the Dawood group appears to have invested heavily in cash buyers thus having a stake in most deals”. It was recorded in a letter of the Standing Monitoring Committee on Ship breaking, Union Ministry of Environment & Forests in May 2011 that the Gujarat Maritime Board (GMB) and Customs were unable to verify the records of some of the ships. It was suggested that the DG shipping be authorized to first verify records before the ships are allowed to dock at the Alang yards. But the GMB officials said this would be acceptable to them only if the DG shipping was able to carry out such verification within 48 hours or it would presume that the records provided by the ship are authentic. This matter has not been resolved as yet.

I submit that the Minutes of the Supreme Court constituted Inter-ministerial committee (IMC) and a sensitive document of Union Ministry of Defence has been filed in the court that reveal how security concerns that emanate from ship breaking activity have been expressed. The relevant excerpts from the fourteen minutes dated February 5, 2004, June 11, 2004, January 19, 2005, June 28, 2005, February 1, 2006, September 21, 2006, January 1, 2007, August 9, 2007, February 28, 2008, February 4, 2009, October 5, 2009, October 5, 2010,September 17, 2010 , July 8, 2011 and February 28, 2012 are given below.

I submit that the minutes of 14th meeting of February 28, 2012 refers to “Security concerns” but does not reveal what has been the response to the several recommendations of IMC in the earlier meetings. The relevant part of the minutes of its 13th meeting reads: “Security concerns: The representative of Coast Guard brought to the notice of IMC that various foreign made communication equipment like emergency beacons brought on board of the ships and taken to breaking yards are not properly deactivated before dismantling the ships. The Coast Guard expressed concern from security angle as there were a few incidents of false alarms emanating from such equipments….” The issue of “false flag certification” was also raised.

I submit that “It was also clarified by GMB that the requisite information would also be sent to MOD” in the minutes. Subsequent to this the minutes of the 14th meeting does not reveal whether Ministry of Defence has been sent information that was promised.

I wish to draw your attention towards the minutes of the 12th meeting. It reads: “Security Concerns – In the last meeting, it had been decided that the Ministry of Shipping would organize a meeting on security matters with GMB, Naval HQ and Coast Guard HQ, Customs etc. to ensure that issues linked to gaps in the security frame-work are addressed on a priority basis. The representative of Naval HQ informed that they have already taken up the matter with the DG Shipping on 3 September 2009 highlighting the necessary precautionary security steps, including a monthly security meeting to be conducted by the Yard/Port Authority. The representative of the DG Shipping informed that the suggestions of the Naval HQ have been conveyed to the Gujarat Maritime Board.” It is not clear whether the suggestions of the Naval Headquarters have been acted upon.

I submit that the minutes of 11th meeting of IMC reads: “Security Concerns – The Coast Guard representative brought out some security concerns and incidents of communication sets from ships reportedly finding their way to the local fisherman.”

I submit that these concerns cannot be taken lightly. The minutes of the IMC meeting reads: “Security Concerns – Both the representative of the Coast Guard and the representative from Naval HQ raised concerns over the entry of ships carrying hazardous cargo to Alang for ship breaking and how no information is made available to them regarding the movement of ships to Alang. Besides this there was no information regarding whether the Alang Port is compliant with the International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code. In the context of the present security concerns in the country, the Chairman advised the representative of the Ministry of Shipping, the GMB officials, the Coast Guard representative and the Naval HQs to address the issue expeditiously so that the security gaps are taken care of and also to verify whether the port at Alang has implemented the ISPS codes.” The entry of dead ships in Indian waters with fake documents reveals that security gaps have not been addressed.

I submit that IMC minutes reads: “Security concerns 16. Representatives of Naval Headquarter pointed out that because of large floating population at Alang it has become a breeding ground for mafia and other anti national elements who are indulging in nefarious activities. He further pointed out that sometimes vessels moving to Alang for breaking do not carry sufficient fuel and may also be not sea worthy. This may cause serious accidents at sea if such vessels are drifting in areas closer to oil field development areas. He therefore requested that there should be strict enforcement of account ability of ships reporting at Alang and the port authorities must share information with intelligence agencies. Further Naval Headquarters should also be informed about war ships and ships with sensitive cargo coming to Alang for ship breaking.” The radioactive wastes laden dead ships and war ships are indeed a matter of huge security concern.

I submit that the minutes of the another IMC meeting reads: “The Coast Guard representative and the Naval HQ representative also expressed apprehensions that the vessels coming in for beaching sometimes ply very close to the oil rigs, which could be a potential for accidents. Though the representative of the DG, Shipping clarified that the ships are to ply on pre-determined chartered routes, it was emphasized that the preventive measures on such matters need to be strengthened and ensure due compliance by all. The Chairman directed that the Ministry of Shipping may organize a meeting on the matter with GMB, Naval HQ and Coast Guard HQ, Custom etc. immediately and ensure that gaps in the security frame-work issues are addressed immediately.” There is a need to examine whether gaps in the security frame-work issues have been addressed as recently as during 2011-12 when 415 dead ships were dumped at Alang beach.

Let me take the opportunity to inform you that the May 3, 2012 order of Justice Altamas Kabir and Justice J. Chelameswar bench of Supreme Court in the matter of a US hazardous dead vessel named 'Oriental Nicety' (formerly Exxon Valdez, Exxon Mediterranean, Sea River Mediterranean, S/R Mediterranean, Mediterranean, and Dong Fang Ocean) that was trying to enter Indian waters at Alang beach Bhavnagar has sought compliance with UN’s Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and Their Disposal to which India is a party. This has vessel has been renamed as MV Oriental N, Gujarat.

I submit that The Washington Post news report, “The many lives of the Exxon Valdez”, March 29, 2012 disclosed that the vessel is on the way to Alang beach. It may be noted that in the year 2000-2001, the buyer of the vessel and the owner of Priya Blue Industries Pvt Ltd, Shri Sanjay P Mehta has been in the ship recycling business as he was engaged with “MARUTI METALS, LLC” in the US as a advisor at the recycling Site at Brownsville, Texas. It was involved in the dismantling of United States Adventure, a US Navy vessel as per the requirements of US Maritime Administration [MARAD] an agency within the US Department of Transportation. After the entrepreneurs of the "MARUTI METALS LLC" decided to close their business in US, Shri Mehta moved to India to further continue his recycling business in Alang-Sosiya, Gujarat India. Its 100% subsidiary, Best Oasis Limited, a newly formed company and a part of "Priya Blue Group" which is a "CASH BUYER" that purchases vessels on "As is Where is basis" to deliver the same for ship dismantling at Alang beach at the convenience of ship owners from developed countries. Hongkong based Best Oasis Limited is a purchaser, seller and financer of end-of-life ships.

I submit that the end-of-life ship 'Oriental Nicety' was purchased in March 2012 by a US based company Global Marketing Systems (GMS), which is one of the biggest, cash buyers for dead ships. It was sold to Best Oasis Company for about $16 million. The Bill of Sale of the ship alone can reveal its true or latent value. This 301 meters long tanker is 50 meters wide, 26 meters depth, weighing 30,000 tons empty and powered by a 23.60 MW diesel engine. US based National Steel and Shipbuilding Company built this tanker for Exxon Mobil Corporation, a US multinational oil and gas corporation and a direct descendant of John D. Rockefeller's Standard Oil Company. It was built in San Diego, California in 1986.

I submit that the GMS was involved in the purchase of controversial radioactive and hazardous waste laden European ship SS Blue Lady (ex-SS Norway, SS France) and was also involved in the Blue Lady case and the dead hazardous US ship Platinum II (ex-MV Oceanic, SS Independence). Platinum II was indicted by US Environmental Protection Agency. This ship was denied beaching permission by Union Ministry of Environment & Forests but the Ministry’s intent was outwitted as the dead ship remained in Indian waters and was illegally scrapped at Gopnath anchorage point in Bhavnagar Gujarat.

In the past 23 years, the dead US vessel MV Oriental N (formerly Exxon Valdez, Oriental Nicety, Exxon Mediterranean, Sea River Mediterranean, S/R Mediterranean, Mediterranean, and Dong Fang Ocean) has been renamed several times. It has worked in at least three areas of the world since it ran aground on Bligh Reef in Alaska's Prince William Sound in March 1989. The 30,000-ton tanker ruptured eight of its 11 oil-storage tanks and spilled nearly 11 million gallons of crude oil into the ecologically rich area. Exxon Mobil spent $30 million to repair the single-hulled ship and moved it to its Mediterranean routes after the US banned the ship from Alaskan waters and a law was passed requiring double hulls on oil tankers.

I submit that the USA which is a non-party to Basel Convention appears to be testing the robustness to the regulatory regime. If a bad precedent is set by allowing this dead US ship, Indian waters will be flooded with hundreds of dead ships both of military and military origin in the aftermath of the lifting of moratorium on transfer of toxic ships to developing countries by US Government.

I submit that a letter to Parliamentary Standing Committee on Transport, Tourism & Culture informing it about a letter of Shri Rajgopal Sharma, Advisor, Indian Embassy, Brussels dated December 20, 2011 wherein it has been revealed that most of the dead and hazardous ships that are currently at Alang beach are in illegal traffic. The letter was based on Shri Sharma’s conversation with Shri Julio Garcia Burgues, Head of the Waste Management Unit, European Commission – DG Environment. This reveals that even EU is trying to transfer its dead ships to India.

In view of the above facts, there is a compelling logic to intervene earnestly to set matters right by sending the dead US ship away from Indian waters.

Thanking You

Yours faithfully

Gopal Krishna
ToxicsWatch Alliance (TWA)
New Delhi
PIN. 110016
Phone: +91-11-26517814, Fax: +91-11-26517814
Mb: 9818089660, 08002263335
E-mail:krishna1715@gmail.com
Web: toxicswatch.blogspot.com

Cc
Shri Anand Sharma, Union Minister of Commerce & Industry
Shri G K Vasan, Union Minister of Shipping
Smt Jayanthi Natrajan, Union Minister of Environment & Forests
Shri Jyotiraditya Madhavrao Scindia, Union Minister of State, Ministry of Commerce & Industry
Chairman & Members, Parliamentary Standing Committee on Science, Technology, Environment & Forests
Shri A K Seth, Cabinet Secretary, Government of India
Secretary, Union Ministry of Commerce & Industry

Secretary, Union Ministry of Shipping

Secretary, Union Ministry of Environment & Forests

Smt. Vijay Laxmi Joshi, Additional Secretary , Union Ministry of Commerce & Industry
Ms Meera Mehrishi, Additional Secretary, HSMD, Union Minister of Environment & Forests
Shri Madhusudan Prasad, Additional Secretary, Union Ministry of Commerce & Industry
Shri Rajeev Kher, Additional Secretary, Union Ministry of Commerce & Industry
Ms Anita Agnihotri, Additional Secretary, Union Ministry of Commerce & Industry
Shri Mukesh Bhatnagar, Additional DGFT, Union Ministry of Commerce & Industry

Dr. Satish B. Agnihotri Director General of Shipping & Ex. Officio Additional Secretary to the Govt. of India

Ms Aditi Das Rout, Director, Union Ministry of Commerce & Industry
Dr. Saroj, Director, HSMD, Union Minister of Environment & Forests
Dr. Manoranjan Hota, Director, HSMD, Union Minister of Environment & Forests
Dr Claude Alvares, Member, Supreme Court Monitoring Committee on Hazardous Wastes
Dr D B Boralkar, Member, Supreme Court Monitoring Committee on Hazardous Wastes
Shri Sanjay Parikh, Lawyer, Supreme Court

Miss Sunita Naraian, Director General, Centre for Science and Environment

Member Secretary, Gujarat Pollution Control Board (GPCB)

Chairman, GPCB

Chairman, Gujarat Maritime Board

Shri S K Sharma, Atomic Energy Regulatory Board

Shri L S Singh, Union Ministry of Steel

ACB, Gandhinagar, CBI

Office of Commissioner, Customs, Ahmedabad

Supreme Court orders of 3rd-11th, & 14th May on Exxon Valdez (MV Oriental Nicety, MV Oriental N) Case

ITEM NO.1 COURT NO.2 SECTION PIL

S U P R E M E C O U R T O F I N D I A
RECORD OF PROCEEDINGS

I.A. No. 61 of 2012 in W.P. (C) No. 657 of 1995

RESEARCH FOUNDN. FOR SCIENCE Petitioner(s)

VERSUS

U O I & ANR. Respondent(s)


(With application for directions)

Date: 14/05/2012 This Petition was called on for hearing today.

CORAM :
HON'BLE MR. JUSTICE DEEPAK VERMA
HON'BLE MR. JUSTICE SUDHANSU JYOTI MUKHOPADHAYA
(VACATION BENCH)

For Petitioner(s) Mr. Sanjay Parikh, Adv.
Mr. A.N. Singh, Adv.
Mr. Bushra Praveen, Adv.
Ms. Mamta Saxena, Adv.


For Respondent(s)/ Mr. Vikas Singh, Sr. Adv.
Applicant Mr. Mahesh Agarwal, Adv.
Mr. E.C. Agarwala, AOR
Mr. Rahul Khanna, Adv.
Mr. Gaurav Goel, Adv.
Mr. Abhinav Agrawal, Adv.

For UOI Mr. T.S. Doabia, Sr. Adv.
& Ors. Mr. Ashok Bhan, Sr. Adv.
Mrs. Asha G. Nair, Adv.
Mr. D.S. Mahra, Adv.
Ms. Kiran Bhardwaj, Adv.
Ms. Sadhana Sandhu, Adv.
Mr. B. Krishna Prasad, Adv.
Mr. Sunil Roy, Adv.
Mr. S.S. Rawat, Adv.
Mr. D.L. Chidanand, Adv.
Ms. Sunita Sharma, Adv.
Mr. Arijit Prasad, Adv.
Mr. T.A. Khan, Adv.
Mr. A.K. Sharma, A.O.R.

Mr. Ashok Kumr Panda, Sr. Adv.
2


Mr. Rutwik Panda, Sr. Adv.

Mr. Mukesh Verma, Adv.
Mr. Yash Pal Dhingra, Adv.

Mr. Gaurav Dhingra, Adv.
Mr. Mukul Singh, Adv.
Ms. Ruchika Bhai, Adv.

Mr. Hemantika Wahi, A.O.R.
Ms. Jesal, Adv.
Mr. R. Pradhan, Adv.

Mr. Pradeep Misra, Adv.

Mrs. Manik Karanjawala, A.O.R.
Mr. Anil Kumar Jha,A.O.R.
Mr. Rishi Agrawala, Adv.
Mr. Rahul Dhawan, A.O.R.
Ms. Shobna M., A.O.R.

UPON hearing counsel the Court made the following
O R D E R

Interlocutory Application No.61 of 2012 has
been filed by M/s. Best Oasis Ltd.
Let notice of this I.A. be issued to the
petitioner of the writ petition as also respondents ­
Union of India and others.




(A.D. Sharma) (S.S.R. Krishna)
Court Master Court Master


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

WP (C) 657/1995
1

ITEM NO.MM 2-I COURT NO.2 SECTION PIL


S U P R E M E C O U R T O F I N D I A
RECORD OF PROCEEDINGS

I.A. NO.61 OF 2012 IN WRIT PETITION (CIVIL) NO.657 OF 1995



RESEARCH FOUNDN. FOR SCIENCE Petitioner(s)

VERSUS

U O I & ANR. Respondent(s)

(With appln(s) for directions)


Date: 11/05/2012 This Petition was called on for hearing today.


CORAM : HON'BLE MR. JUSTICE ALTAMAS KABIR
HON'BLE MR. JUSTICE SURINDER SINGH NIJJAR


For Petitioner(s) Mr. Sanjay Parikh, AOR

For Respondent(s)/ Mr. Vikas Singh, Sr. Adv.
Applicant Mr. Mahesh Agarwal, Adv.
Mr. Rishi Agrawala, Adv.
Mr. E.C. Agarwala, AOR
Mr. Gaurav Goel, Adv.
Mr. Abhinav Agrawal, Adv.
Mr. Rahul Dhawan, Adv.
Ms. Shobana M., Adv.

Mr. Arijit Prasad, Adv.
Mr. T.A. Khan, Adv.
Mr. A.K. Sharma, AOR

For Ministry of Mr. T.S. Doabia, Sr. Adv.
Shipping Ms. Kiran Bhardwaj, Adv.
Mr. D.S. Mahra, Adv.

Mr. Hemantika Wahi, AOR

For UOI Mr. Ashok Bhan, Sr. Adv.
Mrs. Asha G. Nair, Adv.
WP (C) 657/1995
2

Ms. Sadhana Sandhu, Adv.
Mr. B. Krishna Prasad, AOR


UPON hearing counsel the Court made the following
O R D E R

Let this application be listed before the Vacation
Bench on Monday (14.05.2012), when the petitioner, Research
Foundation for Science, will be at liberty to take all
objections, as may be necessary, in regard to the question
of certification of the ship prior to its entry into Indian
territorial waters.

(Chetan Kumar) (Juginder Kaur)
Court Master Assistant Registrar


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

W.P. (C) 657/1995
1

ITEM NO.3 COURT NO.2 SECTION PIL


S U P R E M E C O U R T O F I N D I A
RECORD OF PROCEEDINGS

I.A. NOS.23, 40, 42, 43, 55, 56 & 57 IN
WRIT PETITION (C) NO.657 OF 1995


RESEARCH FOUNDN. FOR SCIENCE Petitioner(s)

VERSUS

U O I & ANR. Respondent(s)


(With appln(s) for directions and impleadment and clarification
and office report)

WITH CONMT. PET.(C) NO.155 of 2005
(With appln.(s) for directions and office report)
SLP(C) NO.16175 of 1997
(With appln.(s) for ex-parte stay and impleading party)
Civil Appeal NO.7660 of 1997
(With office report)


Date: 03/05/2012 These Petitions were called on for hearing today.


CORAM :
HON'BLE MR. JUSTICE ALTAMAS KABIR
HON'BLE MR. JUSTICE J. CHELAMESWAR


For Petitioner(s) Mr. Sanjay Parikh, AOR
Ms. Mamta Saxena, Adv.
Mr. A.N. Singh, Adv.
Ms. Bushra Praveena, Adv.

In SLP 16175/1997 Ms. B. Vijayalakshmi Menon, AOR

In CA 7660/1997 Mr. P. Parmeswaran, AOR

In CP 155/2005 BY POST

For Respondent(s) Mr. P.P. Malhotra, A.S.G.
UOI Mr. Ashok Bhan, Sr. Adv.
W.P. (C) 657/1995
2

Ms. Sadhana Sandhu, Adv.
Mr. B. Krishna Prasad, AOR

Mr. Anil Kumar Jha, AOR

Mr. Manik Karanjawala, AOR

Mr. K.B. Rohtagi, AOR

Mr. Ashok Mathur, AOR

Mr. Shakil Ahmed Syed, AOR

For UPPCB Mr. Pradeep Misra, AOR
Mr. Suraj Singh, Adv.

Mr. Gopal Singh, AOR

For State of Mr. Khwairakpam Nobin Singh, AOR
Manipur Mr. Sapan Biswajit Meitei, Adv.
Mr. Techi Poto, Adv.

For State of Mr. Anil Shrivastav, AOR
Arunachal Pradesh Mr. Rituraj Biswas, Adv.

Mr. Amit Kumar, AOR

Mr. Rakesh K. Sharma, AOR

Mr. Radha Shyam Jena, AOR

Mrs. Urmila Sirur, AOR

Ms. Sushma Suri, AOR

Mrs. Anil Katiyar, AOR

For State of UP Mr. Kamlendra Mishra, AOR
Mr. Upendra Mishra, Adv.

M/s. Sinha & Das

Mr. Sanjay R. Hegde, AOR

For State of Assam Ms. Vartika Sahay Walia, Adv.
for M/s. Corporate Law Group

Mr. Aruneshwar Gupta, AOR
W.P. (C) 657/1995
3

Mr. Janaranjan Das, AOR

Mr. Ejaj Maqbool, AOR

Ms. Bina Gupta, AOR

Ms. S. Janani, AOR

Mr. Ajay Sharma, AOR

Mr. Atishi Dipankar, AOR

Mr. Nikhil Nayyar, AOR

Mr. P.S. Sudheer, AOR

For DPCC Mr. D.N. Goburdhan, AOR
Mr. Prabal Bagchi, Adv.

Mr. Mukesh Verma, Adv.
Mr. Yash Pal Dhingra, AOR

For Defaulter Nos. Mrs. Jayashree Wad, Adv.
3 to 7 Mr. Ashish Wad, Adv.
Ms. Tamali Wad, Adv.
Ms. Kanika, Adv.
for M/s. J.S. Wad & Co.

Mr. Gaurav Agrawal, AOR

Ms. Binu Tamta, AOR

Mr. Ashwani Bhardwaj, AOR

Mr. E.C. Agrawal, AOR

Mr. R. Satish, AOR

Mr. Jay Savla, AOR

Mr. A. Raghunath, AOR

Mr. Ravindra Kumar, AOR

For R-7 Mr. Mohan Prasaran, A.S.G.
Mr. Sunil Roy, Adv.
Ms. Sunita Sharma, Adv.
Ms. Asha G. Nair, Adv.
Ms. Kiran Bhardwaj, Adv.
W.P. (C) 657/1995
4

Mr. D.S. Mahra, AOR

For Ministry of Mr. T.S. Doabial, Sr. Adv.
Shipping Ms. Kiran Bhardwaj, Adv.
Mr. D.S. Mahra, AOR

Mr. E.C. Agrawala, AOR

Mr. Pragyan P. Sharma, Adv.
Mr. Rupesh Gupta, Adv.
Ms. Mandakini Sharma, Adv.
Mr. P.V. Yogeswaran, AOR
Mr. S. Muthu Krishnan, Adv.
Mr. Gautam Dhamija, Adv.

Mr. V.N. Raghupathy, AOR

Ms. Sumita Hazarika, AOR

Mr. D.N. Mishra, AOR

For State of MP Ms. Vibha Datta Makhija, AOR

For Govt. of Mr. V.G. Pragasam, Adv.
Puducherry Mr. S.J. Aristotle, Adv.
Mr. Praburamasubramanian, Adv.

State of Haryana Mr. Kamal Mohan Gupta, AOR

Mr. Pramod Dayal, AOR

Mr. Sushil Kumar Jain, AOR

Mr. B.V. Balaram Das, AOR

For State of Ms. Asha G. Nair, AOR
Maharashtra

For State of Dr. Manish Singhvi, AAG
Rajasthan Mr. Abhinav Ramkrishna, Adv.
Mr. Milind Kumar, Adv.

Ms. B. Sunita Rao, Adv.

In CP 155/2005 Mr. M.J. Paul, AOR

Mr. Sudarsh Menon, AOR

For Orissa SPCB Mr. A.K. Panda, Sr. Adv.
W.P. (C) 657/1995
5

Mr. Satyabrata Panda, Adv.
Mr. Rutwik Panda, AOR


In CA 8300-8301/04 Mrs. Nandini Gore, AOR


For State of Gujarat Ms. Hemantika Wahi, AOR
Ms. Jesal, Adv.
Ms. Rojalin Pradhan, Adv.

For Bhopal Group Ms. Karuna Nandy, Adv.
for Information & Ms. Aparna Bhat, AOR
Action

Mr. Shekhar Kumar, AOR

For SCMC Mr. Raj Panjwani, Sr. Adv.

For CPCB Mr. Vijay Panjwani, Adv.

For Dinesh Chandra Mr. Ranjit Kumar, Sr. Adv.
Applicant in IA 23 Mr. C. Mukund, Adv.
Mr. Ashok Kumar Jain, Adv.
Mr. Pankaj Jain, Adv.
Mr. P.V. Saravana Raja, Adv.
Mr. Bijoy Kumar Jain, AOR

For R-8/ Ludhiana Mr. Chirag Jamwal, Adv.
Refineries

For Official Mr. Manish Bishnoi, Adv.
Liquidator

For M/o Customs & Mr. Arijit Prasad, Adv.
Excise Mr. T.A. Khan, Adv.
Mr. Arvind Kumar Sharma, Adv.


UPON hearing counsel the Court made the following
O R D E R

In response to the prayers made in I.A. No.43 of
2007, filed by one Mr. Kishore R. Shah, a Member of the
Citizen Council, Chala ­ Vapi, we had directed the States of
Madhya Pradesh and Gujarat to file affidavits with regard to
the supply of fresh drinking water to the affected areas.
As far as the State of Gujarat is concerned, Ms. Hemantika
Wahi, learned senior Standing Counsel for the State of Gujarat, has filed an affidavit and has also indicated that
steps have already been taken to supply fresh drinking water
in the areas, in and around Wapi and Ankleshwar.
Mr. Sanjay Parikh, learned counsel appearing for the petitioners, may
seek instructions in regard to the statements made in the
said affidavit and report back to us.

As far as Bhopal is concerned, an affidavit has been
filed on behalf of the State, affirmed by the City Engineer
of the Municipal Corporation of Bhopal, stating that steps
have been taken in the fourteen localities, indicated by the
applicant and the Bhopal Group for Information and Action,
for supplying drinking water by overground pipelines to the
inhabitants of the said fourteen localities.
Ms. Vibha Datta Makhija, learned counsel appearing for the State of
Madhya Pradesh, has submitted that while the main pipelines
have been laid, a decision has also been
taken by the Municipality to provide each individual household with a
separate tap connection and that steps are being taken in
that regard. Ms. Makhija has also submitted that the matter
is in the process of execution and will take some time to
complete.

Ms. Karuna Nundy, learned counsel appearing for Bhopal Group for Information and Action, submits that the said Non-Governmental Organization has been working with the municipal authorities, not only in identifying the areas, but also in trying to expedite the work of laying down the
pipelines for supply of fresh drinking water. She also
7 submits that though the work is being undertaken, it is progressing at a very slow pace.
Ms. Nundy has also pointed out certain discrepancies
indicated in the Chart, which has been made Annexure A-2 to
the affidavit filed on behalf of the NGO.

Since, admittedly, steps are being taken to provide
the fourteen identified areas and the four additional areas,
which have been subsequently identified, with fresh drinking
water through pipelines, the only order that we are inclined
to pass today is for expedition of the work.

Although, we are informed that the Supreme Court Monitoring Committee,
which had earlier been appointed, has almost become defunct,
as also the local Committees appointed by it in different
areas, we are of the view that there should be a Monitoring
Committee to oversee the part of the work, which is now
being undertaken by the Bhopal Municipality for providing
fresh drinking water to the eighteen affected areas near the
Plant.

Accordingly, we constitute a Committee for the aforesaid purpose, with the Executive Chairman of the Madhya Pradesh State Legal Services Authority as the Chairperson of the Committee, which will include (1) The Commissioner, Gas
Relief and Rehabilitation, (2) The Commissioner, Bhopal Municipality, (3) The Executive Engineer, Bhopal Municipal
Corporation, (4) The Member Secretary of the Madhya Pradesh
State Pollution Control Board, (5) a member from the Bhopal
Group for Information and Action, a person nominated by the
Research Foundation for Science, the petitioner in the writ
petition itself, and the Member Secretary of the Madhya Pradesh State Legal Services Committee.

The other Non-Governmental Organizations, who have been assisting in the process of providing fresh drinking
water or other activities to provide relief for the people
of the different areas, may continue to assist the Committee
in the work of implementing the scheme for providing fresh
drinking water to the people of the various localities indicated.

The entire exercise should be completed within three months from the date of communication of this order to the Executive Chairman of the State Legal Services Authority and the Members of the Committee and both the State Government
and the Bhopal Municipal Corporation, shall ensure that the work does not suffer or is not obstructed on account of inadequate or insufficient funds.


Let copies of this order be made available to Mr. Sanjay Parikh, learned counsel for the Research Foundation for Science, who is requested to communicate the same to all the concerned authorities and each of the Members of the aforesaid Committee.

The Committee, thus appointed, is to submit its report to this Court, with regard to the work undertaken in terms of this order, on 13th August, 2012, when I.A. No.43 of 2007, along with the other
connected applications, are to be listed for further consideration.

Mr. Sanjay Parikh also submitted that a separate interlocutory application has been filed, which is yet to be numbered, in which it has been indicated that a foreign ship, which is alleged to be contaminated, has entered into Indian Waters, though, it has not yet been allowed to berth in any of the ports, without taking proper steps for decontamination in the port of export. A copy has been provided to Mr. Ashok Bhan, learned senior counsel appearing for the Union of India and Mr. T.S. Doabia, learned senior counsel, who submits that he is appearing on behalf of the Ministry of Shipping, Government of India. Both, Mr. Bhan and Mr. Doabia, are requested to take instructions on the statements made in the interlocutory application and to inform this Court as to the steps being taken to prevent the ship berthing in any of the ports in India, without following the conditions indicated in the Basel Convention.

The respondents in the interlocutory application will be entitled to file their respective counter affidavits to the same, within six weeks. Rejoinder thereto, if any, may be filed within two weeks thereafter.

Let this interlocutory application, as well as the other connected interlocutory applications, be listed on 13th August, 2012, also.

The Convenience File, which had been filed on behalf of the alleged contemnors in the contempt petition filed, be tagged with I.A. No.23 of 2007.


(Chetan Kumar) (Juginder Kaur)
Court Master Assistant Registrar

19/05/2012

Cabinet Committee on Security Should Intervene to Stop Dumping of Dead Ships at Alang Beach

Press Release

Cabinet Committee on Security Should Intervene to Stop Dumping of Dead Ships at Alang Beach

Attempts by US and EU Ship owners to Dumps Their Dead Ships Should Be Resisted

New Delhi 19/5/2012: In a letter sent to the Cabinet Committee on Security (CCS) on May 18, 2012, ToxicsWatch Alliance (TWA) has sought its intervention to deal with the security Concerns from ongoing dumping of dead Ships at Alang Beach, Bhavnagar, Gujarat. The letter is attached.

TWA has cited specific documents like the report of the Directorate of Naval Intelligence, Union Ministry of Defence and the Minutes of the Supreme Court constituted Inter-ministerial committee (IMC) on Ship breaking during the period 2004-2012.

One of the minutes of the IMC meeting cited in the letter reads: “Security Concerns – Both the representative of the Coast Guard and the representative from Naval HQ raised concerns over the entry of ships carrying hazardous cargo to Alang for ship breaking and how no information is made available to them regarding the movement of ships to Alang.” The entry of dead ships in Indian waters with fake documents reveals that security gaps have not been addressed.

Another IMC minutes reads: “Security concerns 16. Representatives of Naval Headquarter pointed out that because of large floating population at Alang it has become a breeding ground for mafia and other anti national elements who are indulging in nefarious activities. He further pointed out that sometimes vessels moving to Alang for breaking do not carry sufficient fuel and may also be not sea worthy. This may cause serious accidents at sea if such vessels are drifting in areas closer to oil field development areas. He therefore requested that there should be strict enforcement of account ability of ships reporting at Alang and the port authorities must share information with intelligence agencies. Further Naval Headquarters should also be informed about war ships and ships with sensitive cargo coming to Alang for ship breaking.” The radioactive wastes laden dead ships and war ships are indeed a matter of huge security concern.

The minutes of the another IMC meeting reads: “… The Chairman directed that the Ministry of Shipping may organize a meeting on the matter with GMB, Naval HQ and Coast Guard HQ, Custom etc. immediately and ensure that gaps in the security frame-work issues are addressed immediately.” TWA has submitted that there is a need to examine whether gaps in the security frame-work issues have been addressed as recently as during 2011-12 when 415 dead ships were dumped at Alang beach.

It has drawn the attention of the CSS towards the attempts by authorities from USA and Europe to transfer their dead hazardous ships to India.

The TWA letter informed the CCS that while India is a party o UN’s Basel Convention on Transboundary Movement of Hazardous Wastes and Their Disposal, USA is a non-party. The latter appears to be testing the robustness of India’s regulatory regime by sending dead ships like Platinum II (ex SS Independence, MV Oceanic) that entered Indian waters on fake documents and is making efforts through corporate veils to dump the dead US vessel MV Oriental N (formerly Exxon Valdez, Oriental Nicety, Exxon Mediterranean, Sea River Mediterranean, S/R Mediterranean, Mediterranean, and Dong Fang Ocean) at Alang beach. This ship has worked in at least three areas of the world since it ran aground on Bligh Reef in Alaska's Prince William Sound in March 1989. The 30,000-ton tanker ruptured eight of its 11 oil-storage tanks and spilled nearly 11 million gallons of crude oil into the ecologically rich area. Exxon Mobil spent $30 million to repair the single-hulled ship and moved it to its Mediterranean routes after the US banned the ship from Alaskan waters and a law was passed requiring double hulls on oil tankers. On the application of convener, TWA, the Supreme Court passed an order on May 3, 2012 seeking compliance with Basel Convention.

TWA has argued that if a bad precedent is set by allowing this dead US ship, Indian waters will be flooded with hundreds of dead ships both of military and military origin in the aftermath of the lifting of moratorium on transfer of toxic ships to developing countries by US Government.

The letter has been sent to through Cabinet Secretary with copies to members of Cabinet Committee on Security, Chairman, Parliamentary Standing Committee on Transport, Tourism & Culture, Chairman, National Advisory Council, Secretary, Union Ministry of Home Affairs, Secretary, Union Ministry of Finance, Secretary, Union Ministry of External Affairs, Secretary, Union Ministry of Defence, Secretary, Union Ministry of Environment & Forests, Secretary, Union Ministry of Shipping, Secretary, Union Ministry of Steel, Secretary, Union Ministry of Law & Justice, Secretary, Union Ministry of Commerce & Industry and Chief Secretary, Government of Gujarat.

In order to take preventive steps in view of the security concerns expressed in the official documents, TWA demands that all dead ships should get mandatory clearance from Union Ministry of Defence.

For Details: Gopal Krishna, Convener, ToxicsWatch Alliance (TWA), New Delhi, Mb:-08002263335, 09818089660
Phone: +91-11-26517814, Fax: +91-11-26517814, E-mail:krishna1715@gmail.com Web: toxicswatch.blogspot.com

18/05/2012

Security Concerns from ongoing Dumping of Dead Ships at Alang Beach, Bhavnagar, Gujarat

To

Dr Manmohan Singh
Cabinet Committee on Security (CCS)
Government of India
New Delhi

Date: 18/5/2012

Through Shri Ajit Kumar Seth, Cabinet Secretary, Government of India

Subject- Security Concerns from ongoing Dumping of Dead Ships at Alang Beach, Bhavnagar, Gujarat

Sir,

Pursuant to my letter dated April 2, 2012 to Union Shipping Minister, I wish to draw your urgent attention in the matter of security concerns from ongoing dumping of dead ships at Alang beach, Bhavnagar, Gujarat that compromises maritime, environmental and national security of the country. The letter was written seeking action to stop the entry of dead US vessel, MV Oriental N (formerly Exxon Valdez, Oriental Nicety, Exxon Mediterranean, Sea River Mediterranean, S/R Mediterranean, Mediterranean, and Dong Fang Ocean).

I submit that so far 5924 dead- ships have been dumped at the Alang beach unmindful of the security concerns expressed officially at least since 2004.

I submit that Income tax raids on 3 Bhavnagar-based ship-breaking firms and their associates have unearthed black money in the form unaccounted for income to the tune of Rs 27 crore. A team of more than 200 officials on February 17, 2012 did search-and-survey operations on 40 premises in Ahmedabad, Bhavnagar, Mumbai and Pune. In 2010, Directorate General of Central Excise Intelligence (DGCEI) had searched 18 premises of 11 ship-breaking companies in Alang. The DGCEI did make an attempt in 2010 to regulate ship breaking activity but seemed to have come under the influence of the unprecedented strike by the industrialists of the ship breaking business.

I submit that a 2004 report of the Directorate of Naval Intelligence, Union Ministry of Defence records:"some ships arriving at the breaking yards...may be involved in nefarious activities". It noted that a large number of cash buyers are Pakistani nationals based in London and the UAE. "Due to large profit margins, the Dawood group appears to have invested heavily in cash buyers thus having a stake in most deals”. It was recorded in a letter of the Standing Monitoring Committee on Ship breaking, Union Ministry of Environment & Forests in May 2011 that the Gujarat Maritime Board (GMB) and Customs were unable to verify the records of some of the ships. It was suggested that the DG shipping be authorized to first verify records before the ships are allowed to dock at the Alang yards. But the GMB officials said this would be acceptable to them only if the DG shipping was able to carry out such verification within 48 hours or it would presume that the records provided by the ship are authentic. This matter has not been resolved as yet.

I submit that I am an applicant in the Supreme Court in the hazardous wastes/ship breaking case.

I submit that the Minutes of the Supreme Court constituted Inter-ministerial committee (IMC) and a sensitive document of Union Ministry of Defence has been filed in the court that reveal how security concerns that emanate from ship breaking activity have been expressed. The relevant excerpts from the fourteen minutes dated February 5, 2004, June 11, 2004, January 19, 2005, June 28, 2005, February 1, 2006, September 21, 2006, January 1, 2007, August 9, 2007, February 28, 2008, February 4, 2009, October 5, 2009, October 5, 2010,September 17, 2010 , July 8, 2011 and February 28, 2012 are given below.

I submit that the minutes of 14th meeting of February 28, 2012 refers to “Security concerns” but does not reveal what has been the response to the several recommendations of IMC in the earlier meetings. The relevant part of the minutes of its 13th meeting reads: “Security concerns: The representative of Coast Guard brought to the notice of IMC that various foreign made communication equipment like emergency beacons brought on board of the ships and taken to breaking yards are not properly deactivated before dismantling the ships. The Coast Guard expressed concern from security angle as there were a few incidents of false alarms emanating from such equipments….” The issue of “false flag certification” was also raised.

I submit that “It was also clarified by GMB that the requisite information would also be sent to MOD” in the minutes. Subsequent to this the minutes of the 14th meeting does not reveal whether Ministry of Defence has been sent information that was promised.

I wish to draw your attention towards the minutes of the 12th meeting. It reads: “Security Concerns – In the last meeting, it had been decided that the Ministry of Shipping would organize a meeting on security matters with GMB, Naval HQ and Coast Guard HQ, Customs etc. to ensure that issues linked to gaps in the security frame-work are addressed on a priority basis. The representative of Naval HQ informed that they have already taken up the matter with the DG Shipping on 3 September 2009 highlighting the necessary precautionary security steps, including a monthly security meeting to be conducted by the Yard/Port Authority. The representative of the DG Shipping informed that the suggestions of the Naval HQ have been conveyed to the Gujarat Maritime Board.” It is not clear whether the suggestions of the Naval Headquarters have been acted upon.

I submit that the minutes of 11th meeting of IMC reads: “Security Concerns – The Coast Guard representative brought out some security concerns and incidents of communication sets from ships reportedly finding their way to the local fisherman.”

I submit that these concerns cannot be taken lightly. The minutes of the IMC meeting reads: “Security Concerns – Both the representative of the Coast Guard and the representative from Naval HQ raised concerns over the entry of ships carrying hazardous cargo to Alang for ship breaking and how no information is made available to them regarding the movement of ships to Alang. Besides this there was no information regarding whether the Alang Port is compliant with the International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code. In the context of the present security concerns in the country, the Chairman advised the representative of the Ministry of Shipping, the GMB officials, the Coast Guard representative and the Naval HQs to address the issue expeditiously so that the security gaps are taken care of and also to verify whether the port at Alang has implemented the ISPS codes.” The entry of dead ships in Indian waters with fake documents reveals that security gaps have not been addressed.

I submit that IMC minutes reads: “Security concerns 16. Representatives of Naval Headquarter pointed out that because of large floating population at Alang it has become a breeding ground for mafia and other anti national elements who are indulging in nefarious activities. He further pointed out that sometimes vessels moving to Alang for breaking do not carry sufficient fuel and may also be not sea worthy. This may cause serious accidents at sea if such vessels are drifting in areas closer to oil field development areas. He therefore requested that there should be strict enforcement of account ability of ships reporting at Alang and the port authorities must share information with intelligence agencies. Further Naval Headquarters should also be informed about war ships and ships with sensitive cargo coming to Alang for ship breaking.” The radioactive wastes laden dead ships and war ships are indeed a matter of huge security concern.

I submit that the minutes of the another IMC meeting reads: “The Coast Guard representative and the Naval HQ representative also expressed apprehensions that the vessels coming in for beaching sometimes ply very close to the oil rigs, which could be a potential for accidents. Though the representative of the DG, Shipping clarified that the ships are to ply on pre-determined chartered routes, it was emphasized that the preventive measures on such matters need to be strengthened and ensure due compliance by all. The Chairman directed that the Ministry of Shipping may organize a meeting on the matter with GMB, Naval HQ and Coast Guard HQ, Custom etc. immediately and ensure that gaps in the security frame-work issues are addressed immediately.” There is a need to examine whether gaps in the security frame-work issues have been addressed as recently as during 2011-12 when 415 dead ships were dumped at Alang beach.

Let me take the opportunity to inform you that the May 3, 2012 order of Justice Altamas Kabir and Justice J. Chelameswar bench of Supreme Court in the matter of a US hazardous dead vessel named 'Oriental Nicety' (formerly Exxon Valdez, Exxon Mediterranean, Sea River Mediterranean, S/R Mediterranean, Mediterranean, and Dong Fang Ocean) that was trying to enter Indian waters at Alang beach Bhavnagar has sought compliance with UN’s Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and Their Disposal to which India is a party. This has vessel has been renamed as MV Oriental N, Gujarat.

I submit that The Washington Post news report, “The many lives of the Exxon Valdez”, March 29, 2012 disclosed that the vessel is on the way to Alang beach. It may be noted that in the year 2000-2001, the buyer of the vessel and the owner of Priya Blue Industries Pvt Ltd, Shri Sanjay P Mehta has been in the ship recycling business as he was engaged with “MARUTI METALS, LLC” in the US as a advisor at the recycling Site at Brownsville, Texas. It was involved in the dismantling of United States Adventure, a US Navy vessel as per the requirements of US Maritime Administration [MARAD] an agency within the US Department of Transportation. After the entrepreneurs of the "MARUTI METALS LLC" decided to close their business in US, Shri Mehta moved to India to further continue his recycling business in Alang-Sosiya, Gujarat India. Its 100% subsidiary, Best Oasis Limited, a newly formed company and a part of "Priya Blue Group" which is a "CASH BUYER" that purchases vessels on "As is Where is basis" to deliver the same for ship dismantling at Alang beach at the convenience of ship owners from developed countries. Hongkong based Best Oasis Limited is a purchaser, seller and financer of end-of-life ships.

I submit that it is a second such ship originally from USA that is outwitting Indian laws. The USA’s regulations and European Union regulations prohibit the entry of such vessels. In an Office Memorandum No.29-3/2009-HSMD, Government of India, Ministry of Environment & Forests, (HSM Division) dated 9th May, 2011, relating to implementation of Supreme Court directions in respect of ship breaking activities, the previous dead and convicted US ship, Platinum II (Ex SS Oceanic, MV Oceanic) was denied beaching permission but it remained in Indian waters without beaching. It had left US waters despite indictment by US Environment Protection Agency with the apparent connivance of MARAD. It had entered Indian waters on fake documents.

I submit that the end-of-life ship 'Oriental Nicety' was purchased in March 2012 by a US based company Global Marketing Systems (GMS), which is one of the biggest, cash buyers for dead ships. It was sold to Best Oasis Company for about $16 million. The Bill of Sale of the ship alone can reveal its true or latent value. This 301 meters long tanker is 50 meters wide, 26 meters depth, weighing 30,000 tons empty and powered by a 23.60 MW diesel engine. US based National Steel and Shipbuilding Company built this tanker for Exxon Mobil Corporation, a US multinational oil and gas corporation and a direct descendant of John D. Rockefeller's Standard Oil Company. It was built in San Diego, California in 1986.

I submit that the GMS was involved in the purchase of controversial radioactive and hazardous waste laden European ship SS Blue Lady (ex-SS Norway, SS France) and was also involved in the Blue Lady case and the dead hazardous US ship Platinum II (ex-MV Oceanic, SS Independence). Platinum II was indicted by US Environmental Protection Agency. This ship was denied beaching permission by Union Ministry of Environment & Forests but the Ministry’s intent was outwitted as the dead ship remained in Indian waters and was illegally scrapped at Gopnath anchorage point in Bhavnagar Gujarat.

In the past 23 years, the dead US vessel MV Oriental N (formerly Exxon Valdez, Oriental Nicety, Exxon Mediterranean, Sea River Mediterranean, S/R Mediterranean, Mediterranean, and Dong Fang Ocean) has been renamed several times. It has worked in at least three areas of the world since it ran aground on Bligh Reef in Alaska's Prince William Sound in March 1989. The 30,000-ton tanker ruptured eight of its 11 oil-storage tanks and spilled nearly 11 million gallons of crude oil into the ecologically rich area. Exxon Mobil spent $30 million to repair the single-hulled ship and moved it to its Mediterranean routes after the US banned the ship from Alaskan waters and a law was passed requiring double hulls on oil tankers.

I submit that the USA which is a non-party to Basel Convention appears to be testing the robustness to the regulatory regime. If a bad precedent is set by allowing this dead US ship, Indian waters will be flooded with hundreds of dead ships both of military and military origin in the aftermath of the lifting of moratorium on transfer of toxic ships to developing countries by US Government.

I submit that a letter to Parliamentary Standing Committee on Transport, Tourism & Culture informing it about a letter of Shri Rajgopal Sharma, Advisor, Indian Embassy, Brussels dated December 20, 2011 wherein it has been revealed that most of the dead and hazardous ships that are currently at Alang beach are in illegal traffic. The letter was based on Shri Sharma’s conversation with Shri Julio Garcia Burgues, Head of the Waste Management Unit, European Commission – DG Environment. The letter reveals that even EU is trying to transfer its dead ships to India.

In view of the above facts, there is a compelling logic for CCS to intervene earnestly to set matters right before it is too late.

Thanking You

Yours faithfully
Gopal Krishna,
ToxicsWatch Alliance (TWA)
New Delhi
Mb:-08002263335, 09818089660
Phone: +91-11-26517814, Fax: +91-11-26517814
E-mail:krishna1715@gmail.com
Web: toxicswatch.blogspot.com

Cc
Members of Cabinet Committee on Security, Government of India
Chairman, Parliamentary Standing Committee on Transport, Tourism & Culture
Chairman, National Advisory Council, Government of India
Secretary, Union Ministry of Home Affairs
Secretary, Union Ministry of Finance
Secretary, Union Ministry of External Affairs
Secretary, Union Ministry of Defence
Secretary, Union Ministry of Environment & Forests
Secretary, Union Ministry of Shipping
Secretary, Union Ministry of Steel
Secretary, Union Ministry of Law & Justice
Secretary, Union Ministry of Commerce & Industry
Chief Secretary, Government of Gujarat

28/02/2012

Non-compliance with Recommendations of IMC, UN & SC Order on Shipbreaking

To

Shri S. Machendranathan,
Chairman, Inter-Ministerial Committee (IMC) on Shipbreaking,
Union Ministry of Steel,
Government of India
New Delhi

Date: 28 February, 2012

Subject-Non-compliance with Recommendations of IMC, UN & SC Order on Shipbreaking

Sir,

This is with reference to today’s meeting of the Inter-ministerial Committee (IMC) on Shipbreaking and pursuant o my earlier communications, I wish to draw your attention towards non-compliance of IMC's recommendations, Supreme Court Order and a letter received by Union Ministry of Shipping in the matter of ship breaking from Shri Rajgopal Sharma, Advisor, Indian Embassy, Brussels dated December 22, 2011. I wish to inform that Parliamentary Standing Committee on Transport, Tourism and Culture is also examining the matter.

I have gone through all the minutes of IMC which are uploaded on steel ministry's website. I have gathered from the deliberations and letter sent to the steel ministry from ministry of environment & forests that despite repeated recommendations issues with regard to occupational health of workers, national security linked with environmental security and entry of dead vessels in India waters on fake documents remains unattended. As a consequence, more than 200 ships which are currently on Alang beach have entered Indian water in violation of Supreme Court's order.

I submit that in the year 2011, 27 workers died in the shipbreaking activities at Alang beach. IMC ought to consider providing relief to these migrant casual workers who live and work in a slave like condition.

I also submit that citing massive pollution as a reason, Sachana shipbreaking plots in Jamnagar district , Gujarat has been closed as per the order of Gujarat government. The Sachna The order's copy in Gujarati and its English translation is attached. Some private agencies have been carrying out ship-breaking work. “The ship-breaking is termed illegal because this breaking activity is going on in the water of Marine National Park. Unless and until, Government of India gives permission, such activity cannot be carried out in the Marine National Park area because Marine National park Jamnagar is a important sanctuary where marine life of excellent quality live,” states an order dated 22-11-2011 from the Office of Chief Forest Conservator “to cancel the plots allotted of Sachana ship braking yard. These plots are in the land of Forest / Marine Sanctuary”.

The order concludes, “GMB has never taken the official permission for the ship-breaking activity. Whatever activity is carried out by GMB is the violation of the rules of Marine National Park. So this activity must be stopped until the permission is granted. GMB must be careful regarding this. If they continue this activity, it will be violation of the rules and the authorities of GMB will be personally responsible for this violation. GMB has never taken the official permission for the ship-breaking activity. Whatever activity is carried out by GMB is the violation of the rules of Marine National Park. So this activity must be stopped until the permission is granted. GMB must be careful regarding this. If they continue this activity, it will be violation of the rules and the authorities of GMB will be personally responsible for this violation.”

The order reads, “Because of ship-breaking, harmful objects like arsenic, mercury, asbestos, oil, etc could harm marine life in the long time. This leads to complex problems for protecting and conserving the Marine National Park and Marine sanctuary.”These observations are quite relevant for the ship-breaking operations on Alang beach, Bhavnagar as well.

I wish to draw your attention towards UN Special Rapporteur's report which reads, "Regulatory authorities in Alang/Sosiya and the shipbreaking industry should step up their efforts to improve health and safety in the yards" because he also states and observes his major concerns as "the health and safety situation prevailing at the shipbreaking yards continues to remain critical, as witnessed by the 12 fatal accidents that occurred in Alang/Sosiya during the course of 2009, and there are a number of identifiable shortcomings which need to be addressed" at page 12 of the report.

The report states, "Health facilities in Alang/Sosiya do not possess sufficient human, technical and financial resources to provide any treatment other than first aid for minor injuries. The nearest hospital equipped to deal with life-threatening conditions is in Bhavnagar, more than 50 kilometres away. The Red Cross hospital in Alang, which the Special Rapporteur visited, can count on only four medical doctors and nine beds to provide health care not only to some 30,000 workers in the yards, but also to the neighbouring villages of Alang (which has a population of about 18,000 people) and Sosiya (4,000 people)" on page 14.

Source: http://www2.ohchr.org/english/bodies/hrcouncil/docs/15session/A.HRC.15.22.Add.3_en.pdf

It observes, "In Mumbai the situation is even worse, with no permanent facilities except first aid and ambulance services." It notes, "most workers, but reportedly also a number of yard owners, are not aware of the serious life-threatening work-related diseases which may result from long-term exposure to toxic and hazardous substances and materials present on end-of-life ships. In particular, it appears that the majority of the workforce and the local population do not know the adverse consequences of prolonged exposure to asbestos dusts and fibres and are not familiar with the precautions that need to be taken to handle asbestos-containing materials."

It is true that "The majority of the workforce lives in overcrowded makeshift facilities just outside the yards. Most accommodations lack basic amenities such as kitchens, toilet facilities, electricity and running water. The water and sanitation facilities available in Alang/Sosiya remain grossly inadequate to deal with the consumption, cooking, and personal and domestic hygienic requirements of the 30,000 workers who work and live there. In Mumbai, the situation is even worse, with no safe drinking water available in the yards."

On page 13, he observes, "the vast majority of the workforce in Mumbai do not receive any information on the hazards or risks to health and safety, nor do they receive any training on how to avoid or minimize them. With regard to safety training, the Special Rapporteur is of the view that existing training opportunities in Alang/Sosiya should be improved, considering the magnitude of the risks associated with shipbreaking activities and the hazardous substances workers are potentially exposed to." The report adds, "Due to the informal nature of working arrangements, workers are not covered by social protection schemes, and do not receive any benefit in case of work-related injuries or diseases."

The Special Rapporteur observes, employers do not pay for long-term medical treatment or for expenses linked to chronic work-related illnesses. Workers do not usually receive any wages or benefits when absent from work on medical grounds. UN Special Rapporteur's assessment reads:”…in India ships are dismantled on beaches, a method commonly referred to as “beaching”. This method of ship dismantling fails to comply with generally accepted norms and standards on environmental protection. Although very little work has been carried out to assess its environmental impact, the dismantling of ships on sandy beaches without any containment other than the hull of the ship itself appears to have caused high levels of contamination of soil, air, and marine and freshwater resources in many South Asian countries, and to have adversely affected the livelihood of local communities surrounding the shipbreaking facilities, which often rely on agriculture and fishing for their subsistence" at page 9 of the report.

I submit that UN Special Rapporteur's recommends "an independent study be carried out to assess the actual and potential adverse effects caused by the discharge of hazardous substances and materials into the natural environment. Such a study should also assess the steps that need to be taken for the gradual phasing out of “beaching” in favour of more environmentally friendly methods of shipbreaking" at page 21 of the report.

With regard to Shri Rajgopal Sharma's letter, I submit that European Commission official in his conversation with Shri Sharma has admitted that currently all trade in dead ships is illegal. The end of life vessels from Europe which constitutes 17 % of world merchant fleet violates Basel Convention, Supreme Court's order and their ow EU Waste Shipment Regulation, 2006. It appears from the letter that EC wants to legitimize its illegal traffic in end of life vessels by amending its EU Waste Shipment Regulation from April 2012 onwards to order to easily transfer their hazardous wastes laden dead ships like Le Clemenceau to Indian beaches while protecting their own.

I submit that this development ought be looked at in the context of the Free Trade Agreements (FTAs) with countries like Japan (1078 page long agreement) and EU (under negotiation) who have been promoting hazardous wastes trade along with countries such as US, Germany, and the UK appear to be outwitting UN’ conventions and Supreme Court’s order by indulging in linguistic corruption by referring to hazardous wastes as recyclable material and non-new goods.

In view of the above, I earnestly request the IMC to submit its minutes, its recommendations and its action taken report to the Supreme Court at the earliest so that remedial measures can be taken at the earliest to safeguard our environmental borders.

I will be happy to share relevant papers in this regard and appear before the IMC as and when required.

Thanking You

Yours Faithfully
Gopal Krishna
ToxicsWatch Alliance (TWA)
New Delhi
Phone: +91-11-2651781, Fax: +91-11-26517814
Mb: 07739308480, 09818089660

Cc

Chairman, Parliamentary Standing Committee on Transport, Tourism and Culture

24/02/2012

Regressive Hong Kong Convention for Ship Dismantling to be discussed at 63rd Session of IMO's MEPC

Note: European Commission's pretence of being sensitive towards environmental and human rights stands exposed. IMO's Hong Kong International Convention for the Safe and Environmentally Sound Recycling of Ships that was adopted in May 2009 is the child of ship owning companies of Europe and Japan.

The deafening silence of European NGOs has been engineered through European Commission's funding. On December 20, 2011, European Commission's head of Waste Unit informed an Indian official in Brussels that all the dead ships which come to India and other ship breaking states are illegal under European Commission's EU Waste Shipment Regulation, 2006. In order to legitimize the same, EC has plans to start the process of diluting and amending its Regulation from April 2012 onwards. This insincerity and double speak of EC reveals that EC is under tremendous influence of ship owning companies so much so that it has chosen not defend its own Regulation. It plans to downgrade its Regulation to make it compliant with yet to be born Hong Kong Convention. The fact is that the Convention is unlikely to take birth because ship breakers and environmental groups in India, Bangladesh and Pakistan are bitterly opposed to it.

EC under the influence of companies feels that it is one of the ways to support its contracting economy and prolonged recession besides secretly signing free trade agreements with developing countries like India, Bangladesh and Pakistan.

It appears that economic crisis in Europe has turned environmental NGOs there to become nationalists and compelled them pay lip service to environmental and occupational health concerns in South Asia. IMO and its master, the ships owners must be quite glad at the turn of the events.

Gopal Krishna
ToxicsWatch Alliance (TWA)

Briefing: 07, February 22, 2012

Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC), 63rd session, 27
February to 2 March 2012

Market-based measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from international
shipping will be among the key items on the agenda of the Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) of the International Maritime Organization (IMO), when it meets for its 63rd session from 27 February to 2 March 2012, at IMO Headquarters in London.

The MEPC will also discuss issues relating to the implementation of the
ship recycling and ballast water management conventions and consider the
adoption of amendments to the International Convention for the Prevention
of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL) relating to reception facilities in Small
Island Developing States.

Market-based measures to address the reduction of GHGs

The MEPC will continue to consider a number of proposals for market-based
measures (MBMs), to assist the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from
international shipping.

This follows the adoption, in July 2011, of amendments to MARPOL Annex VI
Regulations for the prevention of air pollution from ships, to add a new
chapter 4 to Annex VI on Regulations on energy efficiency for ships to make
mandatory the Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI), for new ships, and the
Ship Energy Efficiency Management Plan (SEEMP) for all ships.

The Committee will have, for its consideration, the report of an
intersessional meeting of the Working Group on GHG Emissions from Ships,
which met in March 2011 to consider suitable MBMs to reduce GHG emissions
from international shipping. This follows the submission to the MEPC of a
comprehensive report by an Expert Group, which had carried out a
feasibility study and impact assessment of several possible MBMs submitted
by Governments and observer organizations.

The inter-sessional group held an extensive exchange of views on issues
related to, among other things, the desirability of MBMs providing:
certainty in emission reductions or carbon price; revenues for mitigation,
adaptation and capacity-building activities in developing countries;
incentives for technical and operational improvements in shipping; and
offsetting opportunities.

The MEPC is expected to outline future work by the Organization on this
matter, including, as identified by the Working Group, further in-depth
examination of the impact of MBMs on world trade and sustainable
development and, in particular, the possible impacts on developing
countries as well as their consumers and industries.

The MBM proposals under review range from a contribution or levy on all CO2
emissions from international shipping or only from those ships not meeting
the EEDI requirement, via emission trading systems, to schemes based on a
ship's actual efficiency, both by design (EEDI) and operation (SEEMP).

Guidelines for the implementation of the mandatory energy efficiency
measures

The MEPC will consider three sets of draft guidelines intended to assist in
the implementation of the Regulations on Energy Efficiency for Ships in
MARPOL Annex VI. The draft guidelines were developed by the intersessional
meeting of the Working Group on Energy Efficiency Measures for Ships, which
met in January 2012. Work on developing EEDI frameworks for those ships
that are not covered by the current EEDI formula will also be progressed.

The MEPC will also consider, with a view to adoption, an MEPC resolution on
technology transfer and the development of alternative technologies to
enable all Member States to meet the challenge of implementing the new
Chapter 4 of MARPOL Annex VI.

Air pollution from ships

The report of the Correspondence Group on the Review of the Status of the
Technological Developments to Implement the Tier III NOx Emissions Standard
will be brought to the attention of MEPC 63.

The MEPC will also continue its consideration of matters relating to the
availability of fuel oil to meet the requirements set out in MARPOL Annex
VI.

NOx technical code amendments

The MEPC will be invited to adopt draft amendments to the NOx Technical
Code 2008, relating to certification of marine diesel engines fitted with
selective catalytic reduction systems.

Amendments to MARPOL relating to regional arrangements for port reception
facilities

The MEPC will be invited to adopt draft amendments to MARPOL Annexes I, II,
IV, V and VI, aimed at enabling Small Island Developing States to comply
with requirements for port States to provide reception facilities for ship
waste through regional arrangements. Parties participating in a regional
arrangement must develop a Regional Reception Facilities Plan and provide
particulars of the identified Regional Ships Waste Reception Centres; and
particulars of those ports with only limited facilities.

MARPOL Annex V (Garbage) guidelines set for adoption

The MEPC will consider, with a view to adoption, the draft 2012 Guidelines
for the Implementation of MARPOL Annex V and draft 2012 Guidelines for the
Development of Garbage Management Plans, developed by an intersessional
correspondence group. The guidelines are intended to assist in the
implementation of the revised MARPOL Annex V Regulations for the prevention
of pollution by garbage from ships, which was adopted at

MEPC 62 in July 2011 and is expected to enter into force on 1 January 2013.

Ballast water management systems up for approval

The MEPC will consider the reports of the 18th, 19th and 20th meetings of
the Joint Group of Experts on the Scientific Aspects of Marine Environment
Protection (GESAMP) Ballast Water Working Group, which met in late 2011,
with a view to granting basic approval to four, and final approval to five,
ballast water management systems that make use of active substances.

The MEPC is expected to reiterate the need for those countries that have
not yet done so to ratify the International Convention for the Control and
Management of Ships' Ballast Water and Sediments, 2004, to achieve its
entry into force at the earliest opportunity. To date, 33 States, with an
aggregate merchant shipping tonnage of 26.46 per cent of the world total,
have ratified the Convention. The Convention will enter into force twelve
months after the date on which not fewer than 30 States, the combined
merchant fleets of which constitute not less than 35% of the gross tonnage
of the world's merchant shipping, have become Parties to it.

Recycling of ships

The MEPC is expected to consider, for adoption, draft Guidelines for safe
and environmentally sound ship recycling, and Guidelines for the authorization of ship-recycling facilities, which have been further developed by the intersessional Correspondence Group on Ship Recycling Guidelines.

These guidelines, along with the 2011 Guidelines for the development of the
Inventory of Hazardous Materials and the 2011 Guidelines for the development of the Ship Recycling Plan that were adopted by MEPC 62, are intended to assist ship-recycling facilities and shipping companies to commence introducing voluntary improvements to meet the requirements of the Hong Kong International Convention for the Safe and Environmentally Sound Recycling of Ships, which was adopted in May 2009.

The MEPC will also consider the further development of draft guidelines for
survey and certification and draft guidelines for the inspection of ships
under the Hong Kong Convention.

Oil pollution response manuals to be considered for approval

The MEPC will consider, for approval, four manuals aimed at supporting
decision-making for tactical response to oil pollution incidents. The
manuals have been developed by the OPRC HNS Technical Group.

http://www.imo.org/MediaCentre/PressBriefings/Pages/07MEPC63preview.aspx

Alang beach getting ready for dumping of dead Japanese ships

Note: Apropos "Japanese draw up $22.5m plan for Alang" (Feb 14, 2012, Gandinagar, The Times of India), the fact is that Alang beach getting ready for dumping of dead Japanese ships. Central and Gujarat government should analyze the 1078 page free trade agreement (FTA) with Japan deeply. Japan was always opposed to Basel Convention and Ban Amendment to regulate hazardous waste trade. Through FTA and the proposed measures in Alang, Gujarat it aims to outwit Supreme Court's order in the hazardous waste case and UN laws. This is a case of waste colonialism unfolding.

Gopal Krishna
ToxicsWatch Alliance (TWA)

Japanese draw up $22.5m plan for Alang

The Japanese have decided to come to Alang, offering to the Gujarat government a major plan to modernize Asia's biggest ship-recycling yard.

A high-level 15-member Japanese delegation, led by Kenji Tomoda, chairman, Ship Recycle sub-committee of the Japanese Ship-owners' Association, met chief minister Narendra Modi and officials of the state ports department on Monday, telling the state government about the need to make Alang's 170 recycling plots, spread over a 10 kilometres stretch, environmentally friendly, such that foreign ships can reach there without any hassle for recycling.

"The cost for modernizing the yard has been estimated at $ 22.5 million. We have asked the Japanese to fund the project. The delegation seemed keen," a senior government official, who was in the meeting with the delegation, told TOI.

Among those who were part of the delegation included top shipping companies like Nippon Yusen Kaisha and Mitsubishi," the official said, adding, "Other representatives included members of the Japanese International Cooperation Agency, which provides technical and other forms of aid promoting economic and social development, and Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry ( METI)."

During their talks with the CM, the Japanese insisted about the need to ensure that Alang complies with the Hong Kong Protocol for Safe and Environmentally-Friendly Recycling, formulated by the International Maritime Organization in 2009.

"This alone with ensure that Japanese ships, which form 15 per cent of the world's total, reach Alang for recycling and do not go anywhere else," the official quoted the Japanese. The official added, "This was the second Japanese visit to India. Immediately after the first visit, we asked Wapcos, the Government of India consultants, to prepare a complete project report on what all is needed in order to implement the Hong Kong protocol, to which India is a signatory."

On their part, the state government assured the Japanese delegation that it will do everything to enforce the Hong Kong protocol, including constructing a safer hazardous waste disposal site and platforms for cutting ships.

The delegation was also assured that better facilities will be created for safer reception of oil from the tankers that come with the ships.

http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2012-02-14/ahmedabad/31058198_1_alang-japanese-ships-foreign-ships

03/01/2012

Ships to be demolished as of 3/1/2012

Global Star [MN] IMO 8800767 Tanker built 1989 - 8,192 dwt [eta Feb]
Buxmaster [LR] IMO 8513807 Cintainer vessel built 1986 - 23,465 dwt
Myra [BS] IMO 7718175 Cargo vessel built 1979 - 17,154 dwt
Rishikesh [IN] IMO 8321084 Cargo vessel built 1986 - 47,315 dwt

Ships demolished in Alang as of 31/12/2011

MARDEN [PA] IMO 8128937 Ro-lo built 1982 - 6,182 dwt
MINOTAUR [BS] IMO 7383360 Tanker built 1977 - 31,489 dwt
Eckhardt [BZ] IMO 7387017 Tanker built 1975 - 9,267 dwt
Atra 1 [PA] IMO 8802337 Cargo vessel built 1987 - 8,730 dwt
Bene Niki [PA] IMO 7411545 LPG tanker built 1978 - 55,173 dwt
Mu San [KRN] IMO 7920596 Cargo vessel built 1981 - 17,618 dwt
Noble Success [PA] IMO 8214865 Cargo vessel built 1982 - 11,283 dwt
Ekram M [TG] IMO 7916105 Cargo vessel built 1980 - 27,476 dwt
Ballina [BS] IMO 8300602 Tanker built 1984 - 124,750 dwt
Falcon Eye I [PA] IMO 7721407 Cargo vessel built 1984 - 12,600 dwt

Ships demolished 19/12/2011

Seaways Valour [IN] IMO 8801345 Cargo vessel built 1990 - 14,100 dwt

Ships demolished as of 16/12/2011

Ohminesan [JP] IMO 9124720 Vlcc tanker built 1996 - 267,721 dwt
Orion Trader [JP] IMO 9156266 Vlcc tanker built 1998 - 267,736 dwt

Ship demolitions as of 15/12/2011

White Sea [SG] IMO 8020206 Crude oil tanker built 1991 - 96,043 dwt
MSC Damla [PA] IMO 7820966 Container vessel built 1980 - 36,392 dwt
Michalis K [PA] IMO 7804390 Cargo ship built 1979 - 16,897 dwt

Ship demolitions as of 13/12/2011

Grand Vision [LR] IMO 9005247 Container vessel built 1991 - 44,013 dwt
Hereford Express [PH] IMO 8202202 Livestock carrier built 1982 - 6,187 dwt
Mig Concord [MD] IMO 7533135 Cargo vessel built 1977 - 27,554 dwt
Tugur [RU] IMO 7524354 Cargo vessel built 1975 - 6,070 dwt
Adventure [TZ] IMO 7359486 Passenger vessel built 1976 - 15,504 dwt

Ship demolitions as of 12/11/2011

Atlantic Liberty [PA] IMO 9106156 Vlcc tanker built 1995 - 281,559 dwt
MSC Mahima [LR] IMO 8308707 Container vessel built 1985 - 53,726 dwt
Kota Abadi [HK] IMO 8310906 Container vessel built 1984 - 21,888 dwt
Ziemia Sunalska [LR] IMO 8207757 Bulker built 1984 - 26,706 dwt

Ship demolitions as of 8/12/11

Forest Hill [MH] IMO 8102543 Cargo vessel built 1982 - 5,600 dwt
Good Luck [CY] IMO 8208000 Bulk Carrier built 1984 - 173,028 dwt
Australia [LR] IMO 9031272 Bulk carrier built 1993 - 172,972 dwt
Flora S [CY] IMO 7718187 Bulk carrier built 1980 - 17,349 dwt
TIRUMALAI [IN] IMO 8512413 Chemical tanker built 1991 - 33,055 dwt
Kalitihi Sea [VC] IMO 8511574 Bulk carrier built 1986 - 25,680 dwt

Ships demolitions as of 6/12/2011

Sami Canbaz [MD] IMO 8828939 Bulk carrier built 1983 - 19,239 dwt
Msc Magali [PA] IMO 7819357 Container vessel built 1980 - 38,485 dwt
Msc Damla [PA] IMO 7820966 Container vessel built 1980 - 36,392 dwt

Ship demolitions as of 5/11/2011

Arwex [DM] IMO 7642534 Cargo vessel built 1975 - 14,550 dwt
Jin Yuan Men [VC] IMO 7609207 Cargo vessel built 1978 - 22,329 dwt
R Shipper [MH] IMO 7909621 Roro built 1979 - 8,765 dwt


Ship demolitions as of 3/12/2011

Paragon [CY] IMO 7639927 Bulk carrier built 1977 - 29,095 dwt
Success Power [PA] IMO 8004521 Bulk carrier built 1982 - 55,912 dwt

Ship demolitions as of 1/12/2011
BONNIE SMITHWICK [BS] IMO 9050084 Ore/Oil Carrier built 1993 - 83,155 dwt

Ship demolitions as of 28/11/2011

Amderma [RU] IMO 8119144 Roro built 1982 - 23,000 dwt
Areti I [PA] IMO 7710771 Cargo vessel built 1979 - 15,884 dwt
General Trader [MD] IMO 8123884 Cargo vessel built 1982 - 7,805 dwt
Ruhunupura [PA] IMO 8120959 Cargo vessel built 1982 - 5,967 dwt
Sami Canbaz [MD] IMO 8828939 Cargo vessel built 1983 - 19,239 dwt
Success Power [PA] IMO 8004521 Bulk carrier built 1982 - 55,615 dwt

Ship demolitions as of 27/11/2011

Ems Traveller [AG] IMO 8324608 Cargo vessel built 1984 - 17,400 dwt
Liquid Crystal [PA] IMO 8905177 Tanker built 1989 - 7,623 dwt

Gujarat, Japan in tie up to upgrade Alang shipyard

Gujarat Maritime Board (GMB) has signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with Japan to upgrade infrastructure at Asia’s largest ship dismantling yard at Alang in Bhavnagar, a top official said.